Category Archives: Nursing Leadership

Nurses Too

In my prior post, I made the case that physicians in leadership roles should maintain a clinical practice. Doing so informs their administrative actions, affords them greater credibility with their peers and strengthens a vital link between the bedside and organizational activities. All of those benefits would accrue to nursing leaders who did the same.

In many organizations, as soon as a nurse takes on a defined managerial role (beyond being the “charge” for a shift) he or she leaves the bedside, never to return. They start to dress differently, with the whites or scrubs replaced with business attire and (often) a white coat. In fact, when I was a resident, we referred to the managerial, non-clinical nursing leaders collectively as “plain clothed nurses.” More importantly, I believe they also start to think and act differently.

Some of that difference is important and appropriate. As they advance organizationally, all leaders – not just nurses — must adjust to new responsibilities, acquire and develop new skills and broaden their perspective. Unfortunately, it also often seems as though clinical leaders lose an important attachment to patient care and to their staff when they are no longer “in the trenches” with them. In fact, it seems that much of what nursing leaders are now asked to do by “rounding” on their staff or regularly visiting nursing units is an attempt to replace what they have lost by leaving the bedside – credibility, first-hand knowledge of organizational effectiveness, and connection to purpose.

I think it would be better if they worked a shift now and again instead.

What do you think?