Category Archives: Organization

Great Doctors of Today and Tomorrow

I recently wrote about the wonderfully inspirational documentary Rx: The Quiet Revolution, which tells the story of how four different groups are transforming health care for the better.  Each group has some pretty amazing physicians who are committed to putting the patient at the center of the system, and they all have a lot to teach the rest of us about truly caring for patients as we “deliver care.” That got me thinking about physicians in our own Health System who are role-models for great care, and also about assuring that future physicians are just as caring and empathetic.

Well, as far as role-models go, it is hard to imagine a better group than the winners of this year’s Patients’ Choice Awards, given to those members of our Medical Group who achieved the highest scores on their patient experience surveys. They are:

Continue reading Great Doctors of Today and Tomorrow

System Readiness

I took advantage of the holiday slow-down in routine meetings to visit our Health System’s new serious transmittable disease unit – the “Ebola Unit” – at Glen Cove Hospital. Wow!

I had the good fortune to have Darlene Parmentier, the nurse manager of the unit, tour me around and explain how patients will be cared for. Darlene is an experienced clinician and had a ready answer for every one of my questions. In fact, she had answers for lots of questions I never thought to ask! Despite the fact that the physical space had been transformed from an unoccupied “regular” hospital inpatient unit into a highly specialized containment and care facility in just days, I was amazed at the thoughtfulness of the design. Here are just a few of the salient features:

  • A dedicated pathway (including a dedicated elevator) from an external ambulance bay directly into the patient care area
  • Ample living space for care givers who may choose to stay on the unit between shifts, complete with thoughtful touches like a ping pong table and an X-box
  • Designated training areas, recognizing that continuous simulation and drilling are integral to the effectiveness of the unit
  • Well marked “zones” that correspond with the risk of contact or exposure to infectious agents, and dictate the different the levels of personal protective equipment that must be worn
  • The pervasive evidence of planning, not just for the range of clinical challenges that may arise, but also for the needs of patients’ families, the impact on caregivers and the reaction of the community and news media

Overall, I came away incredibly impressed. Once again, our Health System has stepped up to do the right thing for our patients and our staff, and I am confident that any patient who needs treatment there will get great care.

Let’s hope it never happens. Continue reading System Readiness

The Next Wave

I was traveling recently and, as I typically do, I bought a copy of Fast Company magazine to read on the plane. I don’t subscribe, but I find that it often has interesting articles on the intersection of technology and business. In the July/August issue, there was an article about GE and its CEO Jeff Immelt that I think has important parallels with the current transformation of healthcare delivery. Continue reading The Next Wave

Ode to the 3X5 Card

A couple of coworkers recently asked me where I got the leather holder for the 3X5 cards that I always have in my shirt pocket. Turns out they wanted to buy one for their boss as a joke. I don’t want to think about what that says about their opinion of my routine, but it did get me thinking about how attached I am to my cards, and why.

Like many physicians I know, I started carrying cards as a medical student to keep track of patients I was following on my hospital rotations. I think I started with 4×6 cards and kept them in the pocket of my short white coat. I “stamped” each with the addressograph card (remember those?) of the patient, and wrote out key facts of the patient’s history, physical findings, and labs. Continue reading Ode to the 3X5 Card